Weekly Meeting

We had some lofty goals for our fourth weekly meeting of the Central Ohio Carpetball Society (C.O.C.S.) and are pleased to report that we have accomplished quite a bit in an evening.

Accomplishments

  1. Installed additional bracing to support table legs
  2. Removed and re-stapled portions of carpet on the playing surface
  3. Upgraded the back-stops from 1×6 to taller 1×8 to protect the players (and trust me, it prevented some serious waste-height casualties)
  4. Added an additional backstop upgrade; carpet
  5. Decided the acceptable “Penal Lines” location – the line that indicates the maximum distance from the player that said player may place their balls. The Penal line shall be placed at 24″ from the drop-off of the gutter. This provides an acceptable distance within reach of an average player and prevents competitive advantage due to arm length.
  6. Thoroughly Cleaned the playing surfaces
  7. Verified membership of the founding members of the Central Ohio Carpetball Society
  8. Performed thorough testing of gameplay between the founding members.

Gameplay Observations

  1. If the throwing ball is tossed beyond the midway point before first making contact with the playing surface, the throwing ball often bounced excessively and often jumps the target ball(s). This may or may not increase the likelihood of the throwing ball leaving the playing surface. Additional testing may be necessary.
  2. It is in fact possible, however unlikely, for the throwing player to contact their own balls with the throwing ball or with their throwing hand. The likelihood increases proportionally to the amount of alcohol consumed. When this occurs, the test rules in place indicate that said player must place the contacted ball half the distance to the gutter, firmly against the side to provide a competitive advantage to the opponent.
  3. While some internet sources seem to indicate that play must end in forfeiture when the throwing ball inevitably leaves the playing surface during a throw, we do not feel that this is necessary. It is not to the advantage of the throwing player, therefore test rules indicate play may continue as though the throwing ball did not leave the playing surface.
  4. It is possible that the throwing ball may contact and cause an opponent’s ball to leave the playing surface. In this event, test rules indicate that the defensive player may return the ball to the playing surface in any legal position they choose.
  5. Depending on the thickness of the carpet covering the playing surface, it may be possible to “stack” balls. This appears to be possible in two configurations: 3 balls in a triangle pattern with 1 on top, or 4 balls in a box pattern with 1 on top. Some testing was conducted, however it has not been confirmed whether this configuration presents an excessive level of risk to the defensive player. It is highly recommended that the defensive player take a position that is forward of the “Penal line” to prevent potential injury. Our test rules do not currently prevent this configuration but this may change after future scrutiny.
  6. Our current Carpetball table is a 12-foot table. It was observed that an alternate table length is a 16-foot (or 15′?) table. To obtain a new dimension of gameplay, it would be possible to simply create an additional 4-foot extension to be placed between the two table halves. This would allow the table to be dynamically extended from a 12-foot to a 16-foot table with little effort.

Exploring gameplay was a large part of this week’s meeting and will continue to be a focus of the Society for many more weeks to come. It is a goal of the Society to define a set of tournament rules that can be used for official tournament play while preserving the ease of play and competitive spirit of non-tournament play.

Photos will be posted soon…

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